A30 and A38 drivers caught at speeds of up to 108mph

Two drivers were caught excessively speeding on the A30 and A38 in Devon and are now facing a ban.

Devon and Cornwall Police alliance roads policing team revealed that it clocked two motorists travelling at over 100mph – with one reaching 108mph.

The Alliance Roads Policing Twitter account warned that both drivers, who were spotted near Exeter, could lose their license as a result of their actions.

The speeding motorists were clocked during a ‘crazy mad’ night for police in Devon, as violence erupted across the UK – with a major incident being declared in Birmingham.

The team warned travelling at 108mph covers 48 metres per second, meaning it will take “more than 200 metres to stop”.

The tweet reads: “One of two drivers recorded at 100mph+ on the A30 and A38 near Exeter today now facing a ban.

“At this speed you’re covering 48 metres per second and will take more than 200 metres to stop. Slow down and get home in one piece.”

Last year, Devon and Cornwall Police announced a new system to report driving offences online, which has seen more drivers facing fines and charges.

Operation Snap is an online facility which enables members of the public to upload video and photographic evidence of traffic offences.

The tool was produced with the support of the Department for Transport and encourages anyone who witnesses a driving offence to report the offending driver through the new tool.

Parking offences and road traffic collisions cannot be submitted through Operation Snap and any footage from anyone under 18 will not be accepted and instead you should report the incident by calling 101.

The website warns that anyone who uses the tool to report an offence “should be prepared to sign a witness statement and possibly give evidence in court”.

The registration of the offending vehicle needs to be visible, otherwise the footage cannot be used.

You can find more information below or by clicking here.

What is Operation Snap?

Operation SNAP is the police response to the ever increasing submissions of video and photographic evidence from members of the public in relation to witnessed driving offences.

What offences are included in Operation Snap?

Operation Snap will investigate road traffic offences such as dangerous driving, driving without due care and attention, careless driving, using a mobile phone handheld, not wearing a seat belt, contravening a red traffic light and contravening solid white lines, however this is not an exhaustive list.

What if I’ve been involved in a road rage incident?

If there has been a serious physical or verbal act of violence following a driving incident then Operation Snap should not be used. The incident should be reported to Devon & Cornwall Police by contacting 101 email as more serious offences may have been committed. If the threat is happening now call the police emergency line by dialling 999.

I cannot read the number plate of the offending vehicle in my video, can you enhance it?

No. The police cannot enhance recorded footage, if you are unable to read the vehicle number plate from the original clip, then the police are unlikely to be able to read it when they replay the footage.

How do I report an offence?

Offences can be reported via Operation Snap.

Will my mobile phone or other recording device be taken from me?

No, the device you use to record the offence will not be taken from you.

What do I need to do with the original recording?

It will be your responsibility to ensure that the original footage is saved in its original format dependant on how it is stored on the device. This could be for example on the internal memory of the device or perhaps on an external storage medium such as an SD card.

So if I have to keep the memory card or device to one side will the police give me a new one?

No. The police do not replace memory cards or devices with like items in any circumstances.

I’ve put my footage on social media, it’s getting lots of likes and comments, can you to take a look please?

Please remove the footage from social media immediately. Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) advice is that your footage should not be in the public domain as this may adversely affect any subsequent proceedings. Please fill in the Operation Snap web form and start the process with us.

Can’t I just send you some screen shots from a video I have? They clearly show the offence I want to bring to your attention.

Only if the images clearly demonstrate the offence being committed. Dependent on the offence, the police may require the video footage of the whole incident. They may also need to see more of your journey so that they can understand the context of what happened.

Will I have to make a statement?

Yes. As part of the Criminal Justice process, and in order to allow the police to deal with the offender in an appropriate manner, you will be required to provide a statement. However this can be completed online and the majority of the statement will be completed as a result of you answering some simple pre-formatted questions.

Why do I have to be willing to go to court to give evidence?

On average only 1 to 2% of all offences reported through Operation Snap result in a court appearance. There are other disposal methods available such as attendance on a driver education course or the acceptance of a fixed penalty notice. The police may not be able to prosecute the offence without you being willing to attend court.

If however on the very rare occasion the offence which you report does require a court appearance, then you will be fully supported through the process.

Will I be kept updated on the progress of my submission?

We will not have the capacity to feed back on every single submission, however we will publish performance data on a regular basis.

Will my own driving or the way in which I captured the footage be scrutinised?

You must be aware that when the police review the footage which you submit they are duty bound to also review the manner of your driving and also the manner in which the footage was obtained. For example, if you were exceeding the speed limit in order to catch up with an offending driver and then proceeded to film them with your mobile phone whilst driving, then the police will consider also taking proceedings against you.

What will happen to the driver?

There are a number of disposal methods available dependant on the nature of the offence. The driver could be offered a driver education course, they could receive a fixed penalty notice, they could receive a summons to attend court or we may decide we are unable to take any further action. The footage and statement will have been reviewed by a police prosecutor who will take all factors into consideration, including current CPS charging standards.

Do I need to have a date/time stamp on my video footage? If so, must this be exactly the right time?

Ideally the date and time should be correct. The video footage is used to support your written witness testimony. You must account for any discrepancies in date/time within your witness evidence presented to us. Your witness statement must clearly state what time/date the incident occurred.

I want you to see the footage but don’t want to go to court. Can’t you just deal with it?

We need your statement; we need to fully understand the situation and people have a right to have matters heard in a court of law. Please fill in the web form Operation Snap. We will be in touch if you are required to attend court and support you through the process.

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How will the evidence I provide be used?

The evidence which you provide to the police by way of the submission of digital media footage and a statement will be reviewed by a Police Prosecutor to firstly establish if an offence has been committed and to identify the specific offence. The information will then be passed to the Devon and Cornwall Police Collisions and Tickets Section where the offence will be processed and certain paperwork will be sent to the driver of the offending vehicle.

Will the offending driver know who I am?

The offending driver will not be provided with your details. However on the rare occasion that the offence which you have reported results in a court appearance, then at this stage the offending driver will become aware of your name but not your address or any other personal details.

Are there any time limits which I must adhere to?

The types of offences that Operation Snap deals with generally have a 6 month time limit for prosecution. The police also have a strict legal obligation to inform the offending driver of the offence which they have committed usually within 14 days of that incident. Please make sure you have uploaded your submissions as soon as possible. Police can usually only continue with submissions that are received within 7 days of the incident.

What if I have footage of other offences not covered by Operation Snap?

If you have footage of any other types of offences that are not road traffic related and not covered by Operation Snap then it is suggested that you contact the relevant authority which generally tends to be the police or the local authority and provide them with the footage. Devon and Cornwall Police can be contacted via the 101 email form.

Devon Live – Devon News